Tag Archives: gender

Computer games – getting it right and wrong since forever

I love computer games.  I’ve been playing them since I was at least 10, so for the majority of my life.  And, in what used to be something unusual, I’m a female gamer.  Like all computer gamers (and people who read books, watch TV, grow plants, etc), I prefer some types of games over others.  I’ve never been much of a first person shooter (FPS), though there have been the odd FPS I’ve enjoyed multiplaying with friends/the household.  I’ve always tended to play god/civilisation-sims (Civilisation, Populous, Sim City, Tropico, etc) and Role Playing Games (yes those based on AD&D style mechanics).

One of the things I’ve noticed about these games is that either you’re playing a faceless character with no specific gender (though the nations in Civilisation are represented by particular historic figures who are gendered), or you can create your own character and pick the image or now the entire appearance that this character has for the game.

Continue reading Computer games – getting it right and wrong since forever

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Oh I see…

Trixan Body type icons
Four round circles, one with the face of a man, one with the face of a girl, one with the face of a boy and one of slim woman's waist showing underpants and bra

Apparently women’s underwear should be sold by torsos only – because women don’t have faces.  In this picture (screen capture taken from Trixan Body’s website), you need to see a woman’s bra and underwear to know that is the icon you need to click on, but don’t for men, girls or boys.

Seriously Trixan Body, you fail at appropriate gender depiction… though you do get points for the girl being the only one of the four icons to be looking straight at the “camera”.

So Trixan Body, I won’t be shopping at your site any time soon, even though you have items I want to buy in sizes that will fit me.  When you’ve stopped believing that portraying women as objects/not people then I might come back and look at the items you sell.

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Hottest 100 Australian Albums of All time – time to vote!

Triple J are running a poll to vote on the hottest 100 Australian albums of all time, and I highly recommend that you go and vote if you’ve ever listened to Australian music ever and enjoyed it.  I’d really appreciate it if when people voted that thought long and hard about their choices.

I voted for:

Clouds  –  Octopus
Crowded House  –  Woodface
Divinyls  –  Desperate
Kate Miller-Heidke  –  Little Eve
Love Outside Andromeda  –  Love Outside Andromeda
Machine Gun Fellatio  –  Paging Mr. Strike
Midnight Oil  –  Blue Sky Mining
Regurgitator  –  Unit
Tripod  –  Box Set
Yothu Yindi  –  Tribal Voice

I’d really be happy if this poll did not become yet another sausage fest as the Hottest 100 Albums of All time did two years ago.

The “Hottest 100 Of All Time” has since aired, and audiences have been shocked to find that only two songs in the top 100 – two! – were sung by women. Only six female-fronted songs made it into the second batch of 100, so it wasn’t as though the men just edged women out in the final vote – women are just overwhelmingly absent. This sort of discrepancy doesn’t happen by accident; we can quibble about the locus of the problem till we’re blue in the face, but it’s a clear sign of entrenched, largely-invisible sexism in action. Quibbling about the locus is pointless because the locus is everywhere. This is the Matrix. (from Hoyden About Town)

 

It is possibly the modern music industry’s greatest tragedy and shame that it has, collectively, worked so hard to exclude women, keep them to the margins or, at best, channel them into narrow moulds. Given everything that worked against them being acknowledged as musicians it is a testament to the astonishing talent, dedication and sheer strength of will of women that any managed to break through and be heard. But break through they did, and they did amazing things, and now Triple J erases them all over again. (from Hoyden About Town)

 

The Hottest 100 is a major Triple J brand, and I guess I’m coming at this from a branding and marketing perspective. It’s a major plank of the station – of the network’s promotion, and to hold it up and say ‘Here’s what our listeners think are the greatest 100 songs of all time’ when there’s no women, I think is a major problem for the station, in terms of its representation of diversity and the diversity of views among youth in Australia. It suggests that Triple J is perhaps playing to, or certainly in the case of this poll, is attracting a very narrow sort of white male oriented audience. What it says about the audience, what it says about the station, what it says about the relationship between station and audience, I think is of concern for Triple J as the – let’s face it, the Government, the ABC’s youth broadcaster, and one that’s funded by all Australians. (from Hoyden About Town)

 

 

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